How to Write a Mainstream Song

How to write a mainstream song

Let’s be real – there’s no blueprint on learning how to write a hit song in 2020. It’s not an easy thing to do. Very little music reaches the top within this competitive music industry.

Let’s be honest, it’s really hard to make music hit these days. As there are thousands of music released every day, a very small amount of that music makes it to the top. To reach the top, you’ll need to take the necessary steps to start your music career successfully.

But another thing is that nobody is really into making mainstream music. But if you want to create hit music and know what makes a song popular, then this article is for you.

We’ve researched for you! So, sit back as in this article, we’re going to know What Makes A Popular Song Popular and How To Write a Mainstream Song.

With that being said, let’s start!

Have a Clear Story

Take a look at the first two lines of your song. Now imagine someone came up to you and asked questions regarding the first two lines. What would your answers be?

If you think there wouldn’t be a clear answer (For example, there is a protagonist in the first two lines but you can’t relate him to the plot of your story) then it’s time to rethink the lyrics. As a record producer and casual fans will be even more uninterested in hearing it.

Relevant Lines Count

Choose a line from your song. Does it make any sense when you read it out loud? Every single line of your song should make sense on its own. It doesn’t need to be dependent on the precedent and subsequent lines.

Every line of your song should communicate with your listeners. Your lines should also be related to the title. Your title is your song’s identity. And, a good song always has interrelation with the title.

Differentiate The Length Of Your Lines

First, type your lyrics on a sheet of paper. If your song won’t fit on one sheet it’s a sign of trouble. Can a box be drawn around your lyrics? Do your lines hit the right portion of the box?

If so then your lyrics are most likely to sound monotonous.

Diversity is important when it comes to lines and patterns of your lyrics. Make sure that they are conversational and rhythmic.

Change Up The Number Of Lines Between Chorus And Verse

Take a look at how many lines you have in your verses. After that look at the lines in your chorus. If they are of the same amount (for example, 6-line chorus and a 6-line verse) then it’s not fully contrasted between the two sections. A good contrast makes a song feel exciting and fresh.

Matching The Beats

Like Skywalker Kush, your beats need to feel sweet here. By making a beat sweet, it means to have the consistency of beats throughout the song.

Now, you’ll need to count the number of beats in your lyrics. Check line 2, verse 2 and line 3, verse 3. Does the number of beats between these verses match? If it’s of the same number then you’re good to go. If not, you’ll need to change up your song.

Having Constant Rhyme Schemes But Changing Up The Way Your Rhyme Sounds

Is your rhyme scheme repetitive? For example, if you have a b, c, b, c rhyme scheme in verse 2, you should continue it in verses 3 and 4.

Now when it comes to the sound of your rhymes, is your song just being a constant cycle of ‘oo’ and ‘ee’ sound? The human ear gets tired easily from songs like this. To make a song good don’t maintain repetition in this section.

Make Sure Your Pronouns Agree With Their Antecedent

Listen to your lyrics, does the pronoun ‘you’ sound like a ‘she’ when you wanted to portray it as a ‘he’? If it does then it’s confusing. Having a confusing lyric will make people think that you were dizzy while writing the song. But in reality, you will be in a complete sense.

A songwriter shouldn’t write ‘I’ a couple of times to refer to a couple of different people. A complex song confuses the listeners. So, try to keep it simple and address pronouns in a sense that listeners can understand it.

Sing Your Melody A Cappella

For this next section, you’ll have to keep an ear out for where the title is going. If your title sounds like the best part of your melody, then congratulations as you’ve utilized the title with perfection.

But if not, you’ll need to patch it up. Also, be sure to have emotional input in your songs. Don’t make it sound like a repetitive nursery rhyme. Make sure not to rush it and take time between each note to make the listener be invested in your song.

Match Your Melody With Chords

Like marijuana and songwriting has a deep connection, chords and melodies have a deep connection too. All music enthusiasts know that each different chord expresses a different emotional tone, Minor chords tend to express sad emotion while Major chords give out a happy/positive feeling.

You need to use your chords appropriately. Don’t be too rapid or complex with chords. A complex cord might seem to be distracting for the majority of the people. Also, try to change up chords as repetition makes music boring easily.

Conclusion

There you have it. You now know the things that make music popular. It might seem a lot to keep in mind. But trust us it is not!

Kathrin Garner is an enthusiastic journalist and writes article on social issues. As an activist, she takes part in FV KASA program, which is a discussion platform on the relevant cannabis topics. So, if you want to know the best how to cleanse your body, feel free to contact her. Also, she is a volunteer at Marijuana Detox.  She searches for current issues, and writes about it to a wide range of readers.

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