Five Music Production Tips I Wish I Knew When I Started

Five music production tips I wish I knew when I startedMaking music is a tiring and cumbersome process that involves long hours, and repeated tweaks and changes. Music production is a constantly evolving field, genres last for a few months and are replaced by a completely new genre in the next few months, just like rock and pop were replaced by dubstep, trance, trap and bass drums. Here are a few  music production tips that I wish I knew when I started out.

Selecting a genre:

Genre selection is a difficult task, when I first started out, I went with the flow and let the music guide, however, this leads to similar sounding songs which a major cause of frustration. One should rather listen to extensive libraries of music and pick out a style that suits his best. Then with the passage of time incorporate those styles into his playing and form a unique composition. To know more about it, have a check out wedding music band for different genres.

Investing in a good instrument:

A good quality instrument goes a long way in helping you record music; this leads to better music production. A good recording equipment can be bought easily, plug and play mics are usually good quality and cheap and are bought by many YouTube cover singers for their music production.

DAWs:

The digital audio workstation is the leading software for music production; extensive studio equipment has become obsolete as this software is portable and versatile. Paired with the right recording equipment these can be very useful. Some examples include fruity loops, Audacity, etc.

Less Is More – Don’t Overload Your Track With Ideas:

At first, when you start making tunes, you won’t be the world beaters straight from the get-go and will feel desperately lacking behind in comparison to your favorite music list. Prevent yourself from falling into the trap of believing that the reason behind your tracks lacked ideas, proceeding to pile even more melody, synchronization, and rhythm into your productions. Even after adding as much as you could add to your music but still finding something missing in it is because you should work on the strong idea for a track to work on.

Continue to look back on, where your track lacked, as sometime your track might lose sonic balance- if the levels between all the elements were not on the right position and the parts that should be cut through didn’t sound well enough, it time to think about the tweaks you can make to things like EQ, Structuring first and volume, etc., before noticing another issue into your session.

Ideas:

You need a relaxed environment, to get your creatives juices flowing, find inspiration from other people, their struggles, the nature of things, the frailty of time, make songs about ideas as these are the songs that tend to leave a lasting impression. A very good example of this is the song Imagine by John Lennon. Which talks about an idea rather than a love story. It also talks about peace and tolerance among one another. And, this is why it is still heard by people of this day and age as well.

Author Bio:

Kristal BeanKristal Bean is a Southern California-based writer and sometimes wedding planner. In her free time, she home-schools, works out and listen to live music. Check her blog Wedding Music Band.

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    Here’s another benefit to collaborating when songwriting. If the co-writers are members of different performing rights organizations (ASCAP, BMI or SESAC) they will each register the song with their respective organizations. Now, instead of only one P.R.O. tracking the performances of the song, there may be two or more organizations tracking the same song and increasing the potential for maximum performance royalty payments.