Daily Chord Progression

34 Responses to Daily Chord Progression

  1. Nope says:

    They’re all perfectly in C. I was hoping for something a little (lot) more chaotic

    • songwriter says:

      That is correct these chord progressions are in the key of C. The point of the app is to provide a prompt from which to begin. You are free to transpose anytime to a different key. In terms of chaotic, perhaps you can refresh the app to reveal a different chord progression, then string several of them together. The apps is not designed for experimental or esoteric progression, but use time proven chord movements.

  2. Digna says:

    I have no experience with music production, but have written a couple cool songs; gave the a melody and have them recorded on my computer. I want to add music to them and looked at software but was told that I need the chord progression to automatically add instruments to my songs. Can someone tell me a quick way to find the chord progression? or a software that I can use to do it?

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  4. Ghuizing says:

    Hi, there, I made an app for Android that generates random chords, check it out ! https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.huizing.geertjan.randomchord

  5. C.m.same says:

    It’s funny that people complain that these progressions are basic. Most (not all) more complex progressions are the same as these just dressed up with extensions and substitutes. With a few tritons substitutions or secondary dominants added these progressions end up being just as complex as anything miles Davis wrote. Think outside the box kids

    • songwriter says:

      That is a great point. Extensions and substitutions will color and flavor of chords. But deep down the progressions are really just basic chords that follow certain harmonic rules. Here are the basic rules for chord progressions

      Each key comprises of three different classes of chords. These classes are called, Tonic, Dominant, and Sub-Dominant.

      The tonic class consists of two chords, one built upon the first scale step. The tonic note is the first note of the major scale, The two chords of the tonic class include the I and vi chords.

      The dominant class consists of notes based on the fifth scale step. The dominate also has three chords. These chords include the V, iii and vii chords. The vii is seldom used.

      The last class of chords is the sub-dominant. This class contains two chords. These chords include the IV and ii chords. The basis of this class is built on the second note of the scale.

      Basic rules for movement.

      • The chords in the Tonic class may progress or move to any other chord in the the same key
      • The chords of the Dominant class can primarily progress into those of the Tonic class. On occasion, it the dominant move to the sub-dominant but preference is given to the tonic.
      • The chords of the sub-dominant class mostly progress to the dominant class.

      This online apps is designed only to create random chord progressions. The concept is to take one of these progressions as a starting point.

  6. BAS agent says:

    It seems to me that every third time I read this, I learn something new again… it’s the post the keeps on giving!

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  8. joey malventano says:

    this is great but its very basic.

    • songwriter says:

      Sometimes it is best to start out with a basic simple idea. Although these random progressions are basic they have all stood the test of time. Once you settle on a progression you are free to modify with substitutions and extensions that will add to the overall sound of the progression

  9. Loopmaster says:

    This is really a useful application. I can use it to stimulate my songwriting. Working with music samples it helps to have chord progressions to work with.

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  11. Earl Karper says:

    I like it! Just as you said it gets the juices flowing. And I do agree that even the simplest chords can be part of the make up for the ‘greatest’ or most complex songs.

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  16. Thomas says:

    Sure, nice tool to make One Direction songs..

    • songwriter says:

      You can do more with the app. Besides, some of the greatest songs use very basic chord progressions. You can even use the app to generate 3 different chord progressions and then make the first one the verse, the second one the chorus and the third one a bridge.

      • Sarah says:

        Some of the greatest songs? By what standard are you setting to make such a statement? Surely basic chords are needed in a composition, though for the GREATEST songs to come out and about, I would say that something beyond a progression generator would be used. A song must start somewhere, absolutely, but to stay within a circle of chords is limiting to a songwriter. As a writer, the next note should be on impulse, to truly convey what it is that must come off.

        • songwriter says:

          Okay, perhaps saying the “Greatest” is a bit of a a “broad brush”.. However, keep in mind that chords are used as harmony to support the melody. BY far the MELODY is the most important part of a music composition. There are some very specific rules regarding the progression of chords. Of course, rules can be broken. That is the exciting part of creativity. The chord progressions presented here are not limited to Popular or Contemporary music but has a solid foundation in Classical music. As far a imposing limits. Limits actually have a greater influence on the creative process. These limits aren’t rules as much as they’re challenges to overcome.

    • Carlos says:

      Just because they’re simple chord progressions doesn’t mean you should just play the chords and that’s it. Even some of the most complex songs are structured over the base of simple chord progressions. It’s a cool tool to figure out different chord progressions, see how they sound and build and arrange over them.

      • songwriter says:

        Carlos, excellent point. This chord progression tool is just a starting point to stimulate creative juices in the songwriting process. Without getting into too much music harmony theory, chords move is very specific directions depending on where that chord is on the scale. With that said I agree that most complex songs are structured over a basic chord pattern.

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  18. fernando garcia says:

    Hi

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