Concepts for Creating a Movie Score Soundtrack

Movie Score Soundtrack Laptop HeadphonesSelecting the ideal music for films is among the most effective branding tools, and many film studios are already capitalizing on this approach. Do you want to learn how to compose music for a movie like a pro? Well, there is no agreed-upon way of music creation for the film. Each composer has their own techniques that might be quite effective to them but inefficient to others. That said, here are some basic music score production tips:

Always Have a Spotting Session

A spotting session is where you sit down with the director to watch the movie you intend to score. This session is useful in learning the general expectation of the director. Plus, it helps you avoid possible misunderstandings when producing your own music for the film. So, make sure to prepare for this meeting effectively.

Mark Your Vision Ahead of Getting Started in Music Production

Have a master cue sheet where you will write time notes as well as create time frames detailing how you will address each film scene. Each scene might need a different rhythm, attitude, or tempo. For instance, for a brawl, you might want to create fast tempo compositions typical of fight scene music.

Understand Subtexts and Scenes before Musical Score Writing

Before making your own music for the film, it is essential for you to adequately understand the movie, its subtexts, and scenes. Knowing the film’s storyline and understanding the experiences of the characters will help you compose excellent music that your director will love.

“Having a knack for the dramatic is what will help you compose music that evokes emotions in the listener and that unites the entire movie. Aim to feel your music as opposed to merely hearing it,” noted John Lawo, a digital video marketing specialist at Skillroads on making dramatic film scores.

Brainstorm for Ideas to Help You Score a Film

After gathering enough info about the motion picture, try to imagine yourself as the characters in the movies. Doing so will help you get ideas of what music will fit each scene.

Focus on Producing Music Rather Than the Film

The award-winning James Newton Howard (who has scored more than 100 films) said that composers ought to focus on writing the music instead of worrying about the film. Thus, after watching the movie and understanding it, devote all your focus and energies on composing music. What you learn from viewing the motion picture will be enough to guide you during the different stages of making the movie score.

Use the Main Soundtrack Motif More Than Once

While there are specific instances that call for unique music, say a chase scene music, the rest of the movie can have different variations of the main motif theme. However, make sure not to tire your audience.

Make Sure the Background Score Conforms to the Film

Ensure that your compositions do not overshadow the film. Your job is to make music that effectively highlights the movie. For example, when making action movies music, it is only right that make them more fast tempo or upbeat.

That’s about it. Now, go and use these tips to make excellent movie scores.

Alice Berg is a career advisor, who helps people to find their own way in life, gives career advice and guidance. In her free time, she likes to play the guitar and write fiction stories. You can find Alice on Twitter and Facebook.
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