Search Results for: Lyric Writing

Q13 Songwriting tips for lyricists, poets and songwriters

Question 13: Should I be worried about what key I write my song in, I’ve heard that using so called open guitar chords is better, such as in the key of E or A, is this true? You should try to write your song in the appropriate key for the singer that is going to demo the song. Or, if you are not a singer, write your song in a key that you particularly like and are comfortable writing in. If you are going to be the singer on your demo, write your song in a comfortable key for you to sing in. Chances are if your song becomes recorded by a major artist they will be doing it a different key anyway, One that is suited to their vocal range. The best key to write in is the one that suits the singer the best. If the singer doesn’t sound good singing it, chances are it will be passed over. The two most important things in a song are: 1. The song itself and 2. The singer singing it. It’s not necessarily what key your song is in that is important, as how it is presented. The average person doesn’t know what key your song is in when listening to it. In fact, unless you are one of the very few people on this planet that is blessed with perfect pitch, Also known as Absolute Pitch, the ability to know what note or “group of notes” are being played just by hearing them, then every key sounds pretty much the same as any other key. So then, what is the best key to write in? Write it in the key of GOOD. That is any key that you are most comfortable writing in, and whatever key makes your

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Author: TheSongsculptor
Duration: 171
Published: 2011-03-19 22:31:00
Q13 Songwriting tips for lyricists, poets and songwriters

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Q22 Songwriting tips for lyricists, poets and songwriters

Question 22: Should I send my material to publishers unsolicited or should I call or write them first and ask their permission to send them a tape, CD or MP3? It is always best to call and ask their permission first. If you have a publishers address only and no phone number call directory assistance for their phone number and give them a call first. You can obtain free directory assistance for most places by dialing 1 + AREA CODE + 555-1212. When you do get through to someone at a publishing company ask them if you can send them a tape, CD or MP3 of your material for consideration. Be sure to ask them how many songs they would be willing to listen on your demo tape. Many publishing company’s will not accept unsolicited material, so don’t waste your hard earned money and your time sending tapes or CD’s out blindly. CALL first. Get permission from a specific person at a company before sending any material. If no one has requested your package, it most likely will be returned to you un-opened and marked “Unsolicited – Return to Sender.” songsculptor.com Richard Melvin Brown (Songsculptor) provides a helping hand to lyricists (with little or no musical ability) in realizing their dreams of becoming a Professional Songwriter. Can you write a GREAT lyric but can’t carry a tune in a bucket? If so visit us on the web at http

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Author: TheSongsculptor
Duration: 87
Published: 2011-03-23 22:03:05
Q22 Songwriting tips for lyricists, poets and songwriters

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Ottawa Songwriting Workshops – How to Convey Emotion with Your Lyric

ottawamusiclessons.com – Artist Development Coach Randy Young (http hosted the SAC Ottawa Writers Group Meeting #1 This monthly songwriting workshop focused on the idea that songs are a form of emotional communication. Our first step in exploring this concept was with lyric. Specifically, How to convey emotion with your lyric. The songwriters faced the challenge on conveying a chosen emotion, without directly referring to it in the lyric. The lyrics were exchanged and interpreted by other writers. This fuelled a discussion about specific tips, trick and strategies on how to convey emotion with your lyric. Join the conversation and share your thoughts and ideas on this subject here… How do you convey emotion in your lyrics?

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Author: ottawamusiclessons
Duration: 308
Published: 2010-08-06 19:48:55
Ottawa Songwriting Workshops – How to Convey Emotion with Your Lyric

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How to write a song: Songwriting Tips Lyrics

Using simile’s and metaphor’s when writing a song. When writing lyrics infer and suggest the meaning rather than spelling it out. www.signaturesound.com/discover www.signaturesound.com/blog

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Author: SignatureSoundStudio
Duration: 170
Published: 2011-01-12 17:29:06
How to write a song: Songwriting Tips Lyrics

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Pat Pattison – Writing Lyrics to Music – Part 3 of 6

Learn more about Pat’s Lyric Writing course at: bit.ly Berklee Professor Pat Pattison discusses writing lyrics to your finished musical arrangements.

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Author: BerkleeMusic
Duration: 261
Published: 2010-08-23 15:30:31
Pat Pattison – Writing Lyrics to Music – Part 3 of 6

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Songwriting tips for lyricists, poets and songwriters

Question 23: How much money can I make if my song becomes a hit? This question is not so easy to answer. First of all you have to define the word HIT. Is it a regional hit, a national hit, or an international hit? Will it become a so-called song standard and be recorded by many different artists over the years? A so-called standard would be a song like (Danny Boy) or a so-called “modern day” standard would be a song like (Help Me Make It Through The Night) or (Yesterday). I’m sure all of these songs have been recorded many times by many different artists and continue to be a source of income for the writer or writers long after their song was originally recorded. This is the type of song that most professional songwriters aspire to write. Here’s a little trivia for you. Remember the theme song from Johnny Carson’s (Tonight Show). I bet you can hear it playing in your head right now. Do you know who wrote that song? A lot of people are surprised to hear that it was the Canadian born songwriter Paul Anka. He is much more well-known for his songs such as Diana, Puppy Love and others. Anyway it is rumored that Paul Anka received over a hundred thousand dollars a year in royalty’s just off of the tonight show theme for all of the 27 or so years the show was on the air. Please don’t quote me on that number as I only heard it through the grape vine, only Paul knows for sure what he made, but one thing is sure, he made a pile of money off of that one little theme song. Just think

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Author: TheSongsculptor
Duration: 183
Published: 2011-03-23 22:07:04
Q23 Songwriting tips for lyricists, poets and songwriters

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Tutorial: Songwriting: How to write song lyrics

***Follow me on twitter twitter.com I get a lot of messages asking how to write songs. The truth is, there is no right or wrong way! Sing about how you feel and if it sounds good then it is good! These are just some tips if you get stuck or need help getting started! I don’t know how much help they’ll be, but I hope they help a little! Check out my original song “In this life of Mine” before you watch! www.youtube.com Post videos of songs you write as a video response and I’ll be sure to watch! Or send them to me as a message if you don’t want to share them with everyone yet :) Lyrics If this would be my final breath, would I look back to find regret, And have I wasted too much time, Here, In this life of mine. I hear a whisper in the wind. It asks me where will I begin, To find a path that I will take, cause no one else can lead the way. How can I say if I’m still real? when I’m the last to know my own secrets. Somewhere, I’ll find a place. None of this will matter. Somehow, I’ll find a way, someway to recover. There will still be days when I won’t recognize myself. I’ll watch my world fall apart, and it can take my dreams, there will be more to chase in this life of mine. A part of me has disappeared, but what is left will be repaired, to finish off what’s still for me. Here, in this life I lead. And still I wonder why I’m here, and why so many people care. A second strikes. A day gone by, In my only piece of forever. Somewhere, I’ll find a place. None of this will

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Author: alyssataubin
Duration: 551
Published: 2009-08-16 18:53:57
Tutorial: Songwriting: How to write song lyrics

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Songwriting tips for lyricists, poets and songwriters – Q10

Question 10 After I finish writing a song and play it for someone, shouldn’t I be worried that they might steal it? The chances of anyone stealing or even wanting to steal your song are slim to nil. True copyright infringement is much rarer than you might think. People just don’t go around stealing other peoples songs and lyrics unless it was recorded by Michael Jackson or some other big superstar, and they turn it into a big hit. Then every Tom, Dick, Harry and Sally seem to come out of the woodwork insisting that they wrote that song way back in 1974. 99.9 percent of these people lose their cases because they have nothing to back up their claims. If you’re still worried REMEMBER THIS. Once you have created a song or a lyric, and registered it in some kind of a fixed or tangible form, it is then a property that You Own, and is automatically protected by copyright. Proof of ownership and copyright is achieved by registration of the copyrighted song. This registered proof need only be a cassette copy of you singing your song, or a music lead sheet of the song. Remember to put the copyright symbol, a small © with a circle around it, followed by the date and your name. Unpublished works need no copyright notice, but it is still a GOOD IDEA to put the ‘copyright’ mark and use the phrase, © unpublished 2011, Your Name words and music by Your Name. Copyright Information, or what I like to call Safe Songwriting is dealt with in detail in Chapter 7 of THE SONGSCULPTOR METHOD

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Author: TheSongsculptor
Duration: 124
Published: 2011-03-19 20:04:29
Q10 Songwriting tips for lyricists, poets and songwriters

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Songwriting Developing – Mastering From lyrics to Rhythm

Songwriting Tips Interview tutorial from Celebrity Black Pinoy.

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Author: ToHereIsToSee
Duration: 264
Published: 2012-01-19 07:21:37
Songwriting Developing – Mastering From lyrics to Rhythm

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Songwriting tips for lyricists, poets and songwriters

songsculptor.com Frequently Asked Questions in the art and craft of songwriting. Question 1, What is a hook? http Richard Melvin Brown (Songsculptor) provides a helping hand to lyricists (with little or no musical ability) in realizing their dreams of becoming a Professional Songwriter. Can you write a GREAT lyric but can’t carry a tune in a bucket? If so visit us on the web at songsculptor.com

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Author: TheSongsculptor
Duration: 192
Published: 2010-04-24 02:47:04
Q1 Songwriting tips for lyricists, poets and songwriters

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Songwriting Lyrics Tips

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Q12 Songwriting tips for lyricists, poets and songwriters

Question 12 I’ve heard that using Rhyming Dictionaries and Thesauruses is cheating, and that you’re not being true to your own creative juices, Is this true? No, I don’t think you are cheating at all when you use these aids to songwriting. Many of the top professional songwriters carry rhyming dictionaries and thesauruses with them wherever they go, just in case some good idea hits them and they want to expand on it right then and there before they lose it. I believe they are a must for all lyricists. Rhyming Dictionaries and Thesauruses are a great way to find just the right rhyme you are looking for, and they can also give you a multitude of ideas for other great lines. While looking for a rhyme to a particular word, you may come across other words or phrases that you had not thought of, that could quite easily inspire you on to write a chorus or other verse that you were still searching for. Your mind is a wonderful tool for connecting things together. When you see a particular word in a rhyming dictionary or thesaurus your mind can work like a computer, and conjure up all kinds of places you can go with that word. The human mind is definitely the world’s greatest and most advanced computer. songsculptor.com Richard Melvin Brown (Songsculptor) provides a helping hand to lyricists (with little or no musical ability) in realizing their dreams of becoming a Professional Songwriter. Can you write a GREAT lyric but can’t carry a tune in a bucket? If so visit us on the web

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Author: TheSongsculptor
Duration: 101
Published: 2011-03-19 21:38:36
Q12 Songwriting tips for lyricists, poets and songwriters

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Q4 Songwriting tips for lyricists, poets and songwriters

songsculptor.com Question 4 I have a way with words but I’m not a very good musician, should I try to write my own music or ask a professional musician to collaborate? An accomplished musical composer could probably think of musical ideas that you would never think of. Sometimes two heads are better than one in creating a dynamite song. It may even turn out that your collaborator will have a few ideas for lyric changes that could be beneficial to the song. Always remember to be open minded. There’s no place for huge egos in the art of songwriting. Remember that it’s the song that is the most important thing. songsculptor.com Richard Melvin Brown (Songsculptor) provides a helping hand to lyricists (with little or no musical ability) in realizing their dreams of becoming a Professional Songwriter. Can you write a GREAT lyric but can’t carry a tune in a bucket? If so visit us on the web at http

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Author: TheSongsculptor
Duration: 66
Published: 2011-02-09 23:17:04
Q4 Songwriting tips for lyricists, poets and songwriters

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Q2 Songwriting tips for lyricists, poets and songwriters

songsculptor.com Frequently Asked Questions in the art and craft of songwriting. Question 2, I can’t think of anything to say, where do I find some ideas http Richard Melvin Brown (Songsculptor) provides a helping hand to lyricists (with little or no musical ability) in realizing their dreams of becoming a Professional Songwriter. Can you write a GREAT lyric but can’t carry a tune in a bucket? If so visit us on the web at songsculptor.com

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Author: TheSongsculptor
Duration: 86
Published: 2010-05-31 01:41:49
Q2 Songwriting tips for lyricists, poets and songwriters

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Q11 Songwriting tips for lyricists, poets and songwriters

Question 11: The melody of my new song sounds kind of familiar but I can’t think of what it reminds me of, should I be worried that I may be stealing somebody else’s melody? There is a school of thought in songwriting that believes people like to hear that which they are familiar with. It simply means people like hearing something that has already been registered in their brain cells. That’s why so many songs have identical or very close chord progressions. They are what they call (tried and true) They’ve worked for so many other songs why not keep using them. Keep it simple (and familiar) but not so simple and familiar as to sound like a bunch of other songs. A lot of blues music sounds almost identical with only the lyrics being a bit different. (To the average listener that is) Don’t tell that to a blues musician, they might get quite upset. Remember the song “Achy Breaky Heart”, I bet the first time you heard that song it reminded you of some other song but you just couldn’t put your finger on it. Well “Achy Breaky Heart” is a very simple song musically with only 2 chords and I’m sure there have been many other songs over the years that have sounded quite similar. Don’t get me wrong, I do like the song, it is very catchy with a little different kind of a hook, and obviously did very well for the writer. Try to be as original as you can without losing that familiar sound. Just remember to keep your melody line a little different and OF COURSE your lyrics. You have to

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Author: TheSongsculptor
Duration: 171
Published: 2011-03-19 21:01:31
Q11 Songwriting tips for lyricists, poets and songwriters

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