Songwriting Series – Part One

Andrew Wasson from Creative Guitar Studio begins a three part series covering the analysis of various songwriting ideas used to create a pop/rock song. The example piece was written by Andrew for the instructional series and contains several sections in it’s layout. In this video Andrew examines the songs key signature, use of harmony and the layout of harmony through the various sections of the piece. To download a Powertab chart for this video lesson, follow the link below: www.creativeguitarstudio.com Official Website: www.andrewwasson.com Follow Andrew on Blogspot creativeguitarstudio.blogspot.com Follow on Twitter: twitter.com MySpace: www.myspace.com Facebook: www.facebook.com

Author: creativeguitarstudio
Duration: 676
Published: 2009-10-20 14:37:15
Songwriting Series – Part One

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  • Songwriter Tip:

    Rhymes are generally categorized as ‘perfect ‘or ‘near. ‘A perfect rhyme is not the best rhyme; the name just refers to the way it is. For instance, the two words ‘mind ‘and ‘find ‘are considered perfect rhymes. The consonants following the rhymed vowel (in this case I) are the same. The two words ‘find ‘and ‘line ‘are considered ‘near rhymes because the consonants after the rhymed vowel are different.

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