Paul Thorn – Songwriting Advice

Paul Thorn hails from Tupelo, Miss., and as the son of a Church of God minister, he traveled with his father, playing tambourine in church revivals. Before he pursued music as a career, he became fascinated with boxing and learned how to box from an uncle who had moved to Tupelo from Los Angeles. By his teens, he was winning fights and ultimately turned professional. In 1987, he fought Roberto Duran on national television.In time, he quit boxing and worked in a furniture factory by day, playing in area clubs and restaurants at night. While performing at a Tupelo pizza joint, he was discovered by a representative of legendary manager Miles Copeland (The Police, Sting). Thorn made his first record Hammer & Nail for A&M Records in 1997 then moved to Copeland’s boutique label Ark 21 for Ain’t Love Strange in 1999. His third album, Mission Temple Fireworks Stand, was released in 2002 on Back Porch/Narada, followed by Are You With Me? in 2004. He has toured extensively, frequently as a special guest of musicians such as Toby Keith, Sting, Mark Knopfler, Jeff Beck, John Hiatt, Richard Thompson, Robert Cray, Marianne Faithfull and John Prine. In addition, he has co-written with artists as diverse as Jon Bon Jovi, Timothy B. Schmit (The Eagles), Kim Richey and Carole King. He is also a prolific painter.

Author: RealLifeRealMusic1
Duration: 19
Published: 2012-04-30 02:09:08
Paul Thorn – Songwriting Advice

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  • Songwriter Tip:

    The function of pay-off lines is to provide a sense of satisfaction and completion for the listener. The pay-off, most often found at the end of the chorus, is the line that ties the song together. It provides the emotional punch, or surprise, and adds impact to the lines that precede it.

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